15 on the Ready: Buy, Drink, Share

15

I read an interesting blog by angelsportion.wordpress.com this past week which focused on his Top 15 whiskies for under $75 that should be in one’s whisky shelf. A blog worth reading – I found it stimulated my curiosity. Do I have a similar list lurking in the house? My first stop was grabbing a copy of my new romp of a book Whisky Tales: Tastings and Temptations. The book covers more than 100 whiskies that I offered at whisky tastings for charities, friends, and private events. They are all on my like list. At the end of the book I proclaim my Top 10 favorite single malts but don’t offer a list of “should haves” under $75. Ok, I needed a plan to work this list out. I checked to see how many of angelsportion’s bottles were mentioned in my book – eight of the fifteen are discussed. Yet, the only whisky from his list that I have not tried is the Glengoyne 17 Y.O. Hmm, what bottles to pick, such a dilemma.

Book in hand, I opened my scotch cabinet and super-secret hiding places and began the quest for the Top 15 under $75. The under $75 wasn’t as difficult as I thought it would be, though a few of my list sneaked towards the $100 mark. And, being a little left of center on most everything, I veered off the single malt course and proudly added a blend and an Irish, a Japanese, and an American whiskey.

 Laphroaig

Once the whisk(e)y list met my own criteria – an opened bottle that I drink regularly and that I proudly offer to guests – I went back to see how many were in the book. As with angelsportion – eight of the fifteen are discussed in the book. Yet, angelsportion and I only have one duplicate whisky on our lists – the Laphroaig Quarter Cask. Just goes to show that personal preferences are key, availability is crucial, many, many price points are still under $75, and most of all there are still ever so many whiskies from Scotland and around the world to discover, taste and share.

 Lagavulin label

For the record, here is my Top 15 whiskies to have around the house and not hidden in the super-secret places. One more deviation – I have ranked my Top 3, the remaining twelve are by country and region, if applicable. My preference for any of the whiskies is dependent on mood, weather, fellow imbibers, time of day, what/who I am reading, tweeting. All these ingredients keep every dram fresh and exciting!

Scotland – my Top 3

  1. Lagavulin 16 YO – Islay
  2. Ardbeg Corryvreckan – Islay
  3. Springbank Madeira 11 YO – Campbeltown

Scotland

  • Bruichladdich The Laddie Ten, Islay
  • Laphroaig Quarter Cask, Islay
  • Highland Park Dark Origins, Orkney
  • Aberfeldy 12 YO, Highland
  • Aberlour a’bunadh, Speyside
  • Glenfarclas 17 YO, Speyside
  • Glenlivet 18 YO, Speyside
  • Oban, Western Highland

Blend

  • Grand MacNish 15 YO, Sherry Cask (makes a great Rusty Nail)

Ireland

  • Bushmills, 16 YO

Japan

  • Suntory Yamazaki 12 YO

United States

  • Westland Single Malt 2 YO 1st Fill Oloroso Barrel, Seattle, Washington (totally buzzed by this one)

Westland

Early on I realized that I needed to have a ranking system for the whiskies I tasted. My system is simple: I number each whisky from 1 – never buy, to 4 – must have. Detailed reviews are not my thing. I am not an expert on using all the monikers that describe the sweet, spicy, savory, subtle, smoky, sherried, candy, etc. flavors of whisky. I leave that to others. Obviously, my list above does not include any “1s”, my Top 3 are definitely “4s” the rest are in between somewhere.

Not to make it sound like a blatant sales pitch, but my book reveals all my wows and hmmms and recommendations for enough whiskies to give readers a sense of who I am and what I prefer. Just saying.

Thank you angelsportion for an inspiring article. I raise a glass!

 

 

Scotch vs the World Tasting

Scotch vs the World Tasting

“Tasting whisky is not “drinking” at all, in the usual sense of the word, but rather an exercise of refined and exclusive pleasure.” Single Malt Whisky an Italian Passion, Umberto Angeloni

May 2011 vsworld

The following is an abbreviated version of Chapter 11 of my book Whisky Tales: Tastings and Temptations. I wrote the book because I have had an enormous amount of fun offering tastings both for friends and for charities and for the occasional paying client.  Along the way I have learned more than I ever new possible about every aspect of whisky.  My goal was to tell  my whisky stories and share what I have learned. The fabulous thing is, I am still learning and, of course, still having a blast! Call me an enthusiast who is no where near being an expert. Simply, I enjoy drinking , sharing and learning about whisky.

Believe it or not, there is a large segment of the population that is not aware of the vast amount of whisky that is produced not only in Scotland but around the world. With that in mind, I thought a tasting that highlighted some of the best from within and outside of Scotland would be unusually interesting and potentially informative for some of my women friends. In addition to friends who drank whisky, I invited a few women who had never attended one of my tastings and had limited experience with whisky but a strong desire to learn more about it.

My collection held plenty of potential whiskies to make this “Scotch vs the World” tasting completely off the charts. I took whiskies out of the scotch cabinet, put some back, sampled a few, dug into the back closet, reviewed what I had offered at other tastings, and who would be attending. With giddy excitement, I finalized the contenders.

When the night arrived, the dining room table was adorned with the chosen whisky and enough glassware for each pour for everyone. Guests were given a scoring sheet which described the industry-recognized nose, palate, and finish of the scotch and the challenger.  Guests were asked to rank the whisky from a low of “1” to a high of “4”. The pairs were also matched with a specialty cheese and crusty bread.

Hawes Wensleydale      Gorwydd Caerphilly      Berkswell

I set the mood as an unrivaled quest, a journey to compare not just four whiskies but six.  We were going to move slowly from whisky to whisky, country to country, linger on the nuances of each scotch and its challenger, and let the whiskies whisper and shout on their own. At the end of the tasting, we would not simply declare our favorite but spend time sifting through the scores that everyone wrote down during the tasting and see what arose above the rest. Of course, we would double check our rankings by sampling another pour of our individual top choices. Then we would eat a decadent chocolate cake with a lovingly treasured Lagavulin 2010, 12 Y.O. Distillers Edition. A rich yet sublime ending befitting the elaborate occasion.

The excitement was electric; six whiskies, unusual pairings, purposeful quest for finding differences, similarities and an ultimate victor.  The cheeses added a delectable dimension to each pairing.  The proclamations of the two women who had never drank top shelf whisky before added laughter and a flair for some dramatics to the festivities. No one took themselves too seriously, but we did take our whisky rankings seriously. Some of the whisky comparisons surprised and delighted me. The pours were a learning experience for me, which is almost as much fun as simply drinking. Almost.

 Redbreast Duff

The first dram of the night was a Gordon & MacPhail, Miltonduff 10 Y.O. Speyside with 43% alcohol.  Gordon & MacPhail is an independent bottling company that has more than 300 different expressions from distilleries across Scotland.  They are known to produce excellent expressions and with the Miltonduff we were going to ease into the night with a balanced, warm fruit and light spice whisky.  Its challenger was one of my particular picks for an everyday Irish, the Redbreast 12 Y.O. at 40%. The cheese for this round was a Hawes Wensleydale, made in England with cow’s milk. The conversation went back and forth, one person ranked the Miltonduff the highest score of “4” and one ranked it a “1”. The Redbreast received no highest score but did amble up close to the Scotch.  Final vote: Miltonduff slightly edged out the Irish challenger.

 Yamazaki Abunadh

Round two pitted Aberlour A’bunadh, Batch 28,a Speyside at 59.7% and no age statement (NAS) against the well-known Japanese Suntory produced Yamazaki 12 Y.O. at 43%.  Both received a few nods to a high score and only one person gave the Yamazaki a low end score. “Intense” was noted for these two competitors, with the Yamazaki leaning towards fruity while the A’bunadh slanted towards spicy.  The cheese served was a Gorwydd Caerphilly, Welsh in origin, made from cow’s milk. Yum. The cheese won raves for pairing compatibility.  Final whisky vote: Scotland Rules! Big difference in the scoring.

 Amrut Springbank

Round three brought two exceptional whiskies both with finishing time in a sweet cask of either Madeira or Sherry. Campbeltown’s Springbank Madeira 11 Y.O. at 55%, my special bottle from the private tasting at the Springbank Distillery was paired with a newcomer in the field, India’s Amrut Intermediate Sherry.  This Amrut began its maturing journey in ex-bourbon casks, then moved on to the ex-oloroso sherry casks, only to finish their time again in ex-bourbon casks. Most unusual and most efficacious. Both the Springbank and the Amrut revealed complexity, a burst of sweetness and a lingering moonlit night finish. It was imperative that we sample another teeny dram of these two wow-makers just to insure all the shades on the palate were being detected. Perfect. Now, we tried each with a crumble of cheese. Berkswell this time, another English cheese. This one made with sheep’s milk, the richest of the three. There was definitely a prolonged sipping and comparing during this third and last round. When the vote was finally taken, the Amrut scored all “4s” with only one “3”.  The Springbank had “4s” and “3s” with one lowly “2”.  The declared winner: Amrut Intermediate Sherry. Sublime.

 Amrut

The top three whiskies for the evening were:

  1. Amrut – top all-around by a wide margin
  2. Aberlour A’bunadh, a bit surprising because of its big burst of alcohol
  3. Springbank Madeira, no one admitted to giving this sweet baby a lowly “2” score during the rounds

Clearly all were delicious, and it was noted that sometimes a great whisky should not be paired but enjoyed during a quiet moment on its own – a chilly night, a wool sweater, a warm fireplace, an intimate moment with a close friend.  Each whisky brings different aspects to the individual drinker, therefore, drink what you enjoy. Don’t be compelled to follow the crowd or latest trend. For example, one of the first-time tasters went out the next day and purchased a bottle of the Yamazaki 12 Y.O. although it was not one of the “winners”. She found her bottle!

The Cheese pairing and some of the tasting notes offered by the participants:

Round One

  • The Cheese: Hawes Wensleydale; cow, mild, nutty, firm yet creamy
  • Scotland: Gordon & MacPhail Miltonduff 10 YO, 43%
    • Notes: Balanced beginning to an evening of tasting; not overpowering with a hint of spice
  • Ireland: Redbreast 12 YO, 40%
    • Notes: Clean and fresh with subtle spice. Perfect for autumn.

Round Two

The Cheese: Gorwydd Caerphilly; cow, mild, salty, buttery; moist, little crumbly

  • Scotland: Aberlour, A’bunadh, Batch 28, NAS, 59.7%
    • Notes: Intense but not overpowering. Some fruit and spicy lingering finish.
  • Japan: Suntory, Yamazaki, 12 YO, 43%
    • Notes: Not as intense and on the sweet side like a cognac. Clean

Round Three

The Cheese: Berkswell; sheep, rich, nutty, dense.

  •  Scotland: Springbank Madeira, 11 YO, 55%
    • Notes: Begins with taste of Madeira but gets deeper, more complex with each sip
  • India: Amrut Intermediate Sherry, NAS, 57%
    • Notes: First blast is strong alcohol but then the sherry comes forward with a hint of pepper and a long sensual finish.

I raise a glass to all who are open to trying new whiskies!