Blarney on the Long Trail

BlarneyontheLongTrail

Blarney: talk that aims to charm, pleasantly flatter, or persuade. AKA: full of baloney.

No Blarney on this blog!

Spur of the moment trips oft result in unexpected surprises. Add to that the opportunity to sample six new whiskies and pure happiness fills the air. As it happens, two of us decided to spend a couple of days in the Green Mountains of Vermont away from the relentless heat of the city. The clever lady that I am, upon confirming a reservation at the Inn at Long Trail in Killington, had me quickly scanning for local distilleries to peruse. To my benefit, Vermont has joined the explosion of entrepreneurs spiriting enthusiastically.

Those who know my book and perhaps check my blog on occasion recognize that my preferred manner of tasting whiskies is to sip and compare with (sometimes) known whiskies of a similar genre. This blog will continue that style. One more caveat, I am a single malt scotch drinker first and foremost….perhaps some of my views below are, therefore, askew.

Let the Vermont journey begin…final destination about three hours north of Boston.

Silo distillery

The first stop was to Silo Distillery located in the same Artisan Park in Windsor that houses the popular Harpoon Brewery. One could easily spend extra time visiting the other new shops in the park – cheeses, sauces, ice cream, with more shops to come soon. My focus was lasered in on Silo.

Unfortunately for me they were out of their whiskey product, but the assistant quickly expounded the virtues of their new whiskey that was being launched that evening. She graciously went to see if a spare bottle was hidden in the office. Sure enough she appeared with a bottle of Aisling as well as the distiller, Chris Magiollo. I was served a generous pour, which I sampled, then quietly tucked the remainder to bring home for a comparison tasting.

Silo Aisling: 40% alc wheat whiskey aged in charred Ash wood staves. The whiskey is fairly colorless with a overly sweet wheat nose, and a taste that is a combination of nutty cloves, syrupy sweet and a bit puzzling to me, perhaps a memory of the concord grape that grows wild in New England. I tried it again at home side by side with a bottle of Bernheim Kentucky Straight Wheat Whiskey, 45% alc. On the box it has a quote by F. Paul Pacult, “Bernheim offers a fine balance of wood, moderately sweet grain, and acity…finishes elegantly, warm.” The color is a beautiful golden and offers whiffs of caramel. Completely different from the Aisling and much more to my liking. Could be Aisling is best served in a cocktail? Silo is a vodka producer after all. I rate the Aisling 1+. The Bernheim somewhere in the 2+ range.

alpacas

Next stop, Quechee Gorge, home of the Antiques Mall, a Cabot cheese sampling store, a few alpacas, and Vermont Spirits.  I have purchased VT Spirits vodkas for number of years now along with their very likable No14 Bourbon (with a touch of maple syrup.) Their latest edition is called Provisional Light Whiskey. Its 45% alc grain whiskey, light golden in color and sweet spice to the taste. It is aged a minimum of nine months and quite appealing. Don’t know how it happened, but I bought a bottle, as well as another bottle of No14.

Provisional whiskey

At home, I paired the Provisional with another whiskey new to me, Appalachian Gap Distillery’s Ridgeline. This baby is 49% alc, rich in color, thick with legs like a big red wine or cognac. The taste reminds me of a cinnamon chewing gum with chocolate finish. The rye shines through much to my pleasure.

I rate the Provisional a 2+ and the Ridgeline a 2+. I really want to give the Ridgeline a 3- but can’t quite justify it.

VT Spirits distillery

Back to the trip. At days end we settled in at the Inn at Long Trail. This rustic Inn is near the Appalachian Trail and Vermont’s Long Trail and usually filled with hikers from around the globe. If by some chance I can be called a hiker by association, well then I’m all in! The Inn has a great Irish Pub, named McGraths, with a predominance of Irish whiskies, all of which I have tippled over the years. The bar’s only new bottle caught my eye: 2Gingers. This little known expression is produced at the Kilbeggan Distillery.  At 40% alc it is very light, very Irish. Is it cinnamon or organge peel on the nose? After sipping, it fades so fast that I cannot find the flavor. That is not a bad thing, just a simple taste that doesn’t go big at all.  I rate the 2Gingers a 2-.

2gingers

The chef at the pub makes all the desserts from scratch, so not to disappoint and to show appreciation for all the hard work in the kitchen, I ordered the double chocolate Irish bread pudding with Irish whiskey sauce. I ordered a Bushmills 21YO to accompany the pudding and fell completely into bliss.

irishchocolate breadpudding

The following day was spent visiting a friend, touring Montpelier, the state capital, and by chance the Fresh Tracks Farm Vineyard and Winery in Berlin. If we must, we must. Established in 2002, Fresh Tracks is a nice distraction along an already scenic back roads drive. There were twelve wines to taste and the three of us managed to share our way through them all.  Several were surprisingly tasty. A few bottles were purchased. But I digress from the mission of whiskey.

Freshtracksfarm  FreshTracksfarmmenu

We couldn’t make it to the Mad River Distillery but Chris from Silo highly recommended its whiskies, so I eagerly purchased a bottle of the rye whiskey. I waited to taste the Mad River until home. For my own mini tasting, I cracked open a bottle of Copper Fox Rye from Virginia and a bottle of Ryan and Wood Rye from Gloucester, MA.

Mad River Rye is 48% alc, ages for a minimum of six months, bold and rich in color, bold and means business in taste – peppery, spicy grains. All that I appreciate in a rye.

Copper Fox is 45% alc, “aged (14 mos) with a progressive series of new and used Applewood and oak chips, inside used bourbon barrels and finished in a second used bourbon barrels.” Copper Fox is lighter and has a finesse as opposed to the boldness of Mad River.

Last up was the Ryan and Wood Rye, which I have written about before. It is overall lighter, softer with some tang to it.

My rankings are based not only on tasting and comparing but also on my preference for big and bold flavors: Mad River a 3; Copper Fox a 2+; and the Ryan and Wood a 2.

FlowersatInnatLongTrail

Visiting Vermont in the summer is an entirely different experience from visiting during skiing season. It is a beautiful state anytime. Actually, the only time to be wary of Vermont is during its fifth season…known to the locals as mud season. Really the mud can rule!

I never cracked open the bottle of Stonecutter Spirits Heritage Cask Whiskey I bought. A bottle to play with on another day. Anticipation!

I raise a glass to summer sipping!

 

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